Not everything is as strict as it seems: a review about Iran and a couple of tips on how to behave

Not everything is as strict as it seems: a review about Iran and a couple of tips on how to behave

Our reader Katerina is married to an Iranian and tries to visit her husband's relatives at least once a year. The “subtleties” learned from a tourist about the banal rules of behavior in Iran: what to wear on the street, how things are with social networks in the country, and whether it is possible to sip wine at least somewhere. Spoiler: not worth it. Did you enjoy reading The Subtleties of Tourism? You know what to do 😉

Dress code for everyone without exception

In Iran, everyone without exception must follow the Islamic dress code – this also applies to tourists, although guests from other countries are treated more loyally. What is the dress code expressed in:

  • Girls must cover their heads with a scarf. A panama hat option, baseball caps are also suitable, but if you plan to visit museums or mosques, it will be much more convenient with a headscarf. It is enough just to throw it over your head.
  • Girls also need to wear a cape or coat to cover their hips. A long shirt will work too.

The ideal comfortable set is jeans or trousers, a T-shirt and a long shirt. The color scheme does not matter, not everything is as strict as it seems.

  • There are mosques where girls are given a special cape – a chador. It needs to be thrown over clothes – it looks interesting, tourists like it.
  • You should not worry about cosmetics, manicure or bright hair color, there are no problems with this. Iranian girls are literally ahead of the rest in this matter.

It is easier for men, but there are limitations for them. Do not wear shorts and off-the-shoulder shirts. Even in Iran, a tie is not very favored in a men's suit. Wearing ties is not a crime, but is considered unacceptable for government employees. Clothing with flags of different countries will also not surprise or shock anyone, even if it is an American flag. But with the symbols of Israel there is a complete ban, this is strictly. 1/1

Transport

Most tourists visit Iran as part of a tourist group, but if you decide to explore the country on your own, there will be no problems either. Iran has a well-developed public transport system, there is even an intercity metro. For example, from Tehran, you can easily take the metro to the Muslim holy city of Qom. All inscriptions at stops are duplicated in Latin.

It is more convenient to travel around the city by taxi, but the bus is sometimes faster, as they go along dedicated lanes. But the trouble with traffic jams in the city.

Renting a car is a bad idea. Firstly, the driving style is specific, and secondly, there are many narrow streets and steep descents and ascents. And gas stations are a whole quest that is unlikely to be mastered by a tourist who has visited the country for the first time.

You should not worry about cosmetics, manicure or bright hair color, there are no problems with this. Iranian girls are literally ahead of the curve in this matter.1/1

Internet

The Internet works well here, there will be an access point in the hotel (and in almost any cafe). But many resources work only through VPN. If suddenly you go to a site objectionable to the state, you will see a picture with information that the site is unavailable and you will be asked to visit more interesting local resources. All Iranians use social networks, there is no secret. Each store has its own Instagram and Facebook accounts* (owned by Meta, this organization and its social networks are recognized as extremist in Russia) and they indicate it on the signs, no problem.

Alcohol

The most popular question from tourists planning to visit Iran. The sale of alcohol is prohibited. Generally. No alcohol law. Friends can treat, from personal stocks. It is better not to try to seek adventure and alcohol sellers, or refuse if you are offered to buy it. Most often it is a fake of very poor quality. It's better to focus on local food and attractions.

Behavior in public places

Another interesting Iranian feature for tourists is dancing. It is not customary to dance here in public places (even at concerts, only clap), but most often the Iranians themselves often violate this rule. People love to dance and sing here, especially in the evenings in the parks. /cp/g0/cpg0gq7x3kg8gwo44kksg4wog.jpg” media=”(max-width: 549px)”>

Not everything is as strict as it seems: a review about Iran and a couple of tips on how to behave

Subtleties of tourism

Summary

Everything is not as strict as it might seem at first glance. It's no problem if you hug or hold each other's hand, if your handkerchief fell off or you suddenly started dancing to the music of street musicians. Iranians are very sociable and hospitable. If you are visiting Iran for the first time, you might think that this is a very closed and harsh Muslim country. But after the first day of your stay in this country, you will relax and it will be easier to relate to everything.

What else to read?

  • This is Iran, Azizam! 12 amazing facts about this country
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  • “Russiya Good”: how our tourists are now treated abroad

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